Maker Faire Taipei 2019

The project PlasticAI was exhibited at Maker Faire Taipei 2019.

The faire itself was full of people and tech-enthusiasts. And exhibitors were so creative that I’ve given additional inspiration from them. Especially it was so encouraging that there were a few people who were very interested in the project PlasticAI in terms of technologies and the marine environment. I greatly appreciate it.

The main takeaway from the show was “the AI does work”. The precision of detecting plastic bottle-caps was so good in spite of the fact that no training on any negative samples was done. But it also turned out that the AI is not enough if I want to pick something up in the real world because the object detection system tells no other information but the bounding box in the input image, which means there is no way to determine the actual distance between the actuator and the target object. Some extra sensors should definitely be added to do this job better.

To demonstrate PlasticAI in the exhibition, I have built a delta robot on which the AI to be put. The robot has 3 parallel link arms and is actuated with 3 servo motors. The main computer for the detection that I used is NVIDIA Jetson nano, which can perform full YOLO with approx 3.5 FPS. I will go into the details about the robot itself in the later article.

The strength of 3d-printed parts is acceptable for this demonstration. But I should try metal parts, too.

The Faire gives me a push. PlasticAI continues…

Plastic Wastes Detection using YOLO

I’m now working on the project “PlasticAI” which is aiming for detecting plastic wastes on the beach. As an experiment for that, I have trained object detection system with the custom dataset that I collected in Expedition 1 in June. The result of this experiment greatly demonstrates the power of the object detection system. Seeing is believing, I’ll show the outcomes first.


the resulted images with predicted bounding boxes

The trained model precisely predicted the bounding box of a plastic bottle cap.

Training Dataset

Up until I conducted a model training, I haven’t been sure about whether the amount of training dataset is sufficient. Because plastic wastes are very diverse in shapes and colors. But, as a result, as far as the shape of objects are similar, this amount of dataset has been proved to be enough.

In the last expedition to Makuhari Beach in June, I’ve shot a lot of images. I had no difficulty finding bottle caps on the beach. That’s sad, but I winded up with 484 picture files of bottle caps which can be a generous amount of training data for 1 class.

The demanding part of preparing training data is annotating bounding boxes on each image files. I used customised BBox-Label-Tool [1].

a sample of bounding-box annotation

Just for convenience, I open-sourced the dataset on GitHub[2] so that other engineers can use it freely.

marine_plastics_dataset
https://github.com/sudamasahiko/marine_plastics_dataset

Training

Training was done on AWS’s P2 instance, taking about 20 minutes. Over the course of the training process, the validation loss drops rapidly.

One thing that I want to note is that there is a spike in the middle of training, which probably means that the network escaped from local minima and continued learning.

The average validation loss eventually dropped to about 0.04, although this score doesn’t simply tell me that the model is good enough to perform intended detection.

Test

In the test run, I used a couple of images that I have put aside from the training dataset. It means that these images are unknown for the trained neural network. The prediction was done so quickly and I’ve got the resulted images.


the resulted images with predicted bounding boxes

It’s impressive that the predicted bounding-boxes are so precise.

Recap

The main takeaway of this experiment is that detecting plastic bottle caps just works. And it encourages further experiments.

Reference

[1] BBox-Label-Tool
https://github.com/puzzledqs/BBox-Label-Tool

[2] marine_plastics_dataset
https://github.com/sudamasahiko/marine_plastics_dataset

Train Object Detection System with 3 Classes

Deep-learning-based object detection is a state-of-the-art yet powerful algorithm. And over the course of the last couple of years, a lot of progress has been made in this field. It has momentum and huge potential for the future, I think.

Now is the high time for actual implementation to solve problems. The project “Microplastic AI” is aiming for building the AI that can detect plastic debris on the beach. And object detection is going to be a core technology of the project.

As in the last article, training YOLO with 1 class was a good success (Train Object Detection System with 1 Class). But in order to delve into this system even deeper, I extended the training dataset and ended up to have 3 classes. Just for your convenience, I open sourced the training data as follows.

GitHub repository:
jp_coins_dataset

The training data has 524 images in total. In addition to that, the dataset has text files in which bounding boxes are annotated. And some config files also come with. At first, I had no idea if this amount of data has enough feature information to detect objects, but the end result was pleasant.

Here’s one of the results.

An interesting takeaway is the comparison between the model trained with 1 class and the one with 3 classes. Prediction accuracy of the model with 3 classes obviously outperforms. I think this is because a 1 yen coin and a 100 yen coin have similar color, and having been both classes trained, the neural network seems to have learned a subtle difference between those classes. This means that if you’re likely to have similar objects

Let’s say you have an image that has an object that you’re going to detect, and visually similar objects may be in the adjacent space. In a situation like that, you should train not only your target object but also similar objects. Because that would allow you a better detection accuracy.

With this experiment done successfully, the microplastic AI project has been one step closer to reality.

References:
Darknet official project site:
https://pjreddie.com/darknet/yolo/
Github repository
https://github.com/AlexeyAB/darknet

Expedition #1

In Makuhari beach, 28th June 2019.

It’s imaginable that learning plastic fragments is challenging for the AI in many ways because plastic wastes, in general, are very diverse in shapes or colors, that makes harder to obtain the ability to generalize what plastic waste should look like. So it’ll be a good approach to split up the problem into several stages. For a starter, I’ll be focusing on detecting plastic bottle caps.

Both luckily and sadly, the beach that day was full of plastic bottle caps. And I took pictures of them with the digital camera and my smartphone, which winded up with about 500 images in total, which can be a generous amount of training data for 1 class of object.

It’s still hard for me though to tell if this works until I train the neural network. Let’s give it a shot.

海洋プラスチック問題 #3

smallplastics and #microplastics that I took still images for deep learning today. This is just ‘batch 1’ and I have a lot more. #AI #DeepLearning 海洋プラスチックAIの深層学習のため、教師データとして本日撮影したプラスチックごみ。念のため袋に入れてとっておきます。各破片10アングル撮影しました。 #AI #深層学習 #microplastics

海洋プラスチック問題 #1

AIを活用して海洋プラスチック問題に取り組んでいます。AIを学習させるためには大量の画像データが必要です。幕張で集めた漂流物を、プラスチックと自然物にひたすら仕分け! Tackling #microplastic using deep learning. To have my AI get trained, I need to give him a lot of train data! 海洋プラスチック #AI #深層学習 #microplastics

AIで画像分類をしよう

この記事で得られるもの

  • 理論はさておき画像AIの実装方法が分かる
  • 教師データを何枚準備すればよいかを考えるきっかけ
  • 具体的なコード、ライブラリ、環境などの情報

はじめに

まさに今、皆さんがAIを実装する時代が来ています。ResNetやGoogLeNet、VGGなど、近年の優れたディープニューラルネットワークの発明、そして、クラウドでのGPU環境の勃興も手伝って、今までになく深層学習の応用実装に手が届く時代となりました。しかし、いざ画像分類のモデルを実際に作成するとなると、教師データをどれくらい準備すればよいか試行錯誤するでしょう。もっとも、データの質により、必要な教師データの数は変わってきます。そして、あなたの分類問題自体の本質的な難易度も必要な教師データ数に影響を与えるでしょう。しかし、データの質を定量的に評価するのは難しく、定性的判断と経験値が必要です。

深層学習の理論や数学はさておき、実際に実装作業を行うことで、AI学習を肌感覚で体験してみてはいかがでしょうか。ここでは具体的な分類モデルの作成を行い、2回にわたる試行–教師データの質が原因で失敗した例(試行1)と、その後、それを踏まえて教師データを作り直し、うまくいった例(試行2)とをそれぞれご紹介していきます。

お題 〜カルダモンを分類しよう〜

グリーンカルダモン、ブラックカルダモン

畳み込みニューラルネットワーク(以下、CNN)の応用として、ここではシンプルな画像の分類問題に取り組みます。CNNでの画像分類は、セキュリティの問題[1]を除けば、技術的には確立されたと言ってもよいでしょう。

はじめに、小さい物体は教師データの撮影が作業的に簡単だと考え、(やや唐突なのはご了承いただいて)スパイスの一種であるカルダモン(以下、試料A)とその近縁種であるブラックカルダモン(ビッグカルダモンとも。以下、試料B)の分類を課題とします。ここで、分類の難易度という観点では「難しすぎず簡単すぎず」を考慮しました。なぜなら、例えば五円玉と十円玉のような簡単な分類はニューラルネットワークを使わずとも単純な画像処理で実現可能だからです。その点、カルダモンの分類はクラス間で形が似ており、色が微妙に異なるという点で、AIに適した分類問題と考えました。

教師データを撮影する

深層学習による画像分類は、一般的に大量の教師データが必要です。多くの画像データを準備するにあたり、インターネットから入手するか、あるいは自分で撮影を行いましょう。今回は撮影します。スマートフォンでカメラ撮影する方法は、まず第一選択となるかと思いますが、撮影角度などの条件を細かく調整したいので、専用の撮影装置を製作しました。仕組みはWEBカメラとモーター制御の円卓をRaspberry Piでコントロールしています。これにより半自動で物撮りをしていきます。

撮影装置

部品はCADで設計し、3Dプリンターで製作しました。

AIの道具たち

ここでAIの道具として、深層学習ライブラリと学習手法を簡単にご紹介します。

PyTorch、ResNet

PyTorch[2]は、高レベルで柔軟な深層学習ライブラリです。また、各種の学習済みネットワークがすぐに利用でき便利です。ここでは高速な学習と高い認識を誇るResNet[3]を使い、あらかじめ学習された重みをもとに学習しなおす転移学習[4]という方法をとります。

転移学習(Transfer Learning)とは

CNNの画像認識をやるとき、ネットワークの重みを初期値から学習させることはまれで、一般的には学習済みの重みが再利用されます。これは転移学習と呼ばれ、比較的少ない教師データ、かつ短時間でネットワークを学習させられるというメリットがあります。これに関しては以下のチュートリアルが分かりやすいです。

TRANSFER LEARNING TUTORIAL

教師データをディレクトリに振り分ける

教師データのディレクトリ構造は以下のように学習用と評価用(それぞれ「train」、「val」に分け、下層にクラスごとにディレクトリを作ります。学習の際はルートのディレクトリ名(ここではcardamon1)を指定します。

cardamon1  
 ├train/  
 │ ├black/ (400ファイル)  
 │ └green/ (400ファイル)  
 └val/  
   ├black/ (100ファイル)  
   └green/ (100ファイル)

ここでは、ファイルの振り分け用に以下のようなスクリプトを作成しました。

(split_image_data.py)

試行1: とにかく数を、しかし過学習に

試料AとBをそれぞれ5サンプル、2台のWEBカメラで7.2度刻みで回転させながら撮影という戦略を取ります。これにより、サンプルごとに100枚を撮影でき、合計で1000枚の画像データが得られます。この時点では、十分な量の教師データだろうと考えていました。

試行1: 学習させる

学習を行う環境は、クラウドのGPUインスタンスが安価で便利です。ここではAWS(Amazon Web Services)のP2インスタンスをDeep Learning AMIで起動し、ライブラリやツールの準備をほとんどすることなくすぐに学習にとりかかります。AWSでの基本的なPyTorchの学習は以下をご参考にしてください。

PyTorchでシンプルな畳み込みニューラルネットワークを作ろう

AWSインスタンスを作成できたら、SSHで接続し教師データと学習用スクリプトをアップロードしましょう。WinSCPなどのファイル転送クライアントを利用してもよいでしょう。学習用スクリプトの全コードは以下です。

(transfer_learning.py)

学習が完了するとモデルが保存されるので、ダウンロードします。

試行1: 結果

結果的には過学習を起こしました。クラスにつき5サンプルという試料の少なさは、たとい細かく撮影角度を変えて大量の画像を用意したところで、各クラスの特性を一般化するには情報が少なすぎると推察できます。学習用スクリプトを実行した結果が以下です。

# python transfer_learning.py cardamon1

Epoch 0/9
----------
train Loss: 0.5644 Acc: 0.7242
val Loss: 0.3478 Acc: 0.9075

...
...
...

Epoch 9/9
----------
train Loss: 0.2609 Acc: 0.8952
val Loss: 0.0930 Acc: 0.9884

Training complete in 1m 33s
Best val Acc: 0.994220

試行2:

試行1ではサンプル数が小さく汎化性能が悪かった、つまり、各クラスの特徴を一般化できていなかったと考えています。そこで次は、試料の数を増やし、クラスごとに30サンプルを用意しました。グリーンカルダモンが50粒、ブラックカルダモンが50粒あります。また、それにより撮影時間が大幅に増えそうなので、撮影角度を大幅に大きくして120度としました。合計で600枚の画像のうち、500枚を教師データとします。学習の結果は以下です。

# python transfer_learning.py cardamon2

Epoch 0/9
----------
train Loss: 0.6062 Acc: 0.6595
val Loss: 0.3957 Acc: 0.8441

...
...
...

Epoch 9/9
----------
train Loss: 0.2917 Acc: 0.8689
val Loss: 0.1027 Acc: 0.9839

Training complete in 1m 16s
Best val Acc: 0.989247

推論

テストとして推論に使用するスクリプトは以下です。

(cardamon.py)

まとめ

以上、試料の数を変えて、2回にわたり教師データの作成と学習を行いました。また、試料は多い方が、全体の教師データ数が小さいとしても、結果的な学習の質は良いことも分かりました。数の観点では、教師データが多すぎて性能が落ちるということはないのですが、しかし現実的には、時間やその他のリソースとのバランスを考える必要があり、十分な性能が得ら得る最小のサイズの教師データ数がポイントとなります。しかし、それは定量的に判断しにくく、感覚や経験が効いてくるところでもあります。ぜひこれを参考にしていただければ幸いです。

参考情報

[1]ディープラーニングにもセキュリティ問題、AIをだます手口に注意
https://tech.nikkeibp.co.jp/it/atcl/column/15/061500148/111400137/

[2]PyTorch
https://pytorch.org/

[3]ResNet
https://arxiv.org/abs/1512.03385

[4]TRANSFER LEARNING TUTORIAL
https://pytorch.org/tutorials/beginner/transfer_learning_tutorial.html